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Curb Your Dog

Friday, 21 December, 2018 - 10:28 pm

 

Dear Friends,
 

It's been a Home Run week at Chabad Beekman-Sutton, and I want to thank over 100 dear friends and partners who came together to make our year-end online matching campaign a huge success. May Hashem bless you for your generosity!

A thought to share: In the late 1960's, Bob Dylan spent a week in Crown Heights, attending the first modern-day Yeshiva for adults interested in learning more about Judaism, Hadar Hatorah. He would return for visits over the years. On one visit, he showed up at the home of his Chabad friend Meir Rhodes with a magnificent great dane which he planned to gift to the Rebbe, since, in his words, "Every royal deserves a great dane". Meir Rhodes politely declined on the Rebbe's behalf, explaining to him that  "The Rebbe trains hounds of another kind." I heard this story directly from Mr. Rhodes, who now lives in Israel, and the symbolism of it struck me.

 The "Tzemach Tzedek" (third leader of Chabad, 1789-1866) teaches that the tefillin strap on the arm- directly across the heart, home of our deepest emotions-symbolizes the leashing of our inner animal. What is our "inner animal"? In the book of Tanya, we learn that we are a two-soul hybrid with a "G-d soul" and "an animal(istic) soul". The key is not to subdue the animal soul- rather, to harness the power and energy of the animal soul for good. In pet parlance, we might say the goal is to train the animal to appreciate the "mystical bone". In a general sense, animals are physically more powerful than humans. and so once we align our "inner animal" as a force of good, we become unstoppable.

At Chabad Beekman-Sutton's weekly Sunday morning (9am) Bagels-Lox-Tefillin Men's Club, we nurture both souls as we invigorate for a week full of success in both material and spiritual realms, to pursue what is deemed noble in the eyes of G-d and in the eyes of man, in the hope that we may be worthy of carrying the title "Man's best friend" -- and G-d's as well.

Warmly, 

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